Archives for category: PBS

Picked up a girlfriend in Chicago, and we still get along almost a year later.

Finished my tenure as editor-in-chief of The Eagle, one of the best weekly student newspapers in the country.

Interned for a phenomenal five months at PBS MediaShift.

Lived for four and a half months in Costa Rica, the most verdant country I have ever had the pleasure to call home.

Traveled in Israel, which I have always called home.

Secured my last internship of my academic career at The Washington Post, a newspaper I have revered since moving to DC three and a half years ago.

Through good times and bad, I could count on friends and family to be there for me.

I’ve made some enemies, I’ve made more friends.

I’ve had some sucesses, I’ve made more mistakes.

I cried, but I more often I laughed.

There have been good days and bad.

I don’t regret a second.

Come at me, 2014. I’m ready for you.

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Your Guide to Privacy by PBS MediaShift (cover)PBS MediaShift has just published a new guide to online privacy, and I’ve written a chapter on big data (or, I wrote an article that has been republished as a chapter). Chapter 14, to be precise.

Proceeds go toward two very deserving organizations: The Electronic Frontier Foundation and Freedom House, both of which fight for freedom of speech both at home and abroad.

You can buy the book now on Amazon, Apple iBook, Google Play and Kobo.

I already bought a version for my Kindle, and you can be sure I’ll be buying a print copy when it’s ready.

You can find the rest of MediaShift’s e-book offerings on its website.


Maybe you’ve always had an idea for a book but were too daunted by the traditional gatekeepers of agents and publishers. Well now you can dust off the manuscript and get read to publish, because the growth of self-publishing services and social media makes it easier than ever to self-publish your book. But whether you self-publish or have a traditional book publisher, you’ll need to do more marketing, more outreach, more organizing — more of everything! Authors are really becoming entrepreneurs, needing to understand the business of book publishing more than ever (even if they never thought they’d need to know this). This week’s Mediatwits talks to successful self-published authors as part of our “Authors as Entrepreneurs” special, including self-published author, expert and MediaShift contributor Carla King and successful self-published authors Darcie Chan and Hugh Howey. MediaShift’s Mark Glaser hosts, along with Mónica Guzmán from the Seattle Times and GeekWire and Andrew Lihfrom American University.

See all of the latest PBS Mediashift research on this topic, as well as bios of the panelists.

This was my last podcast I helped produce for MediaShift before I left Sept. 4.

How can journalists fight the war on journalism, both in the U.S. and abroad? As governments hunt down whistleblowers, leakers and journalists alike, many reporters are worried they now work in a world that criminalizes their profession, calling this a “DEFCON 2 journalism event.” Most recently, Chelsea (formerly known as Bradley) Manning, the source of the Wikileaks disclosures three years ago was sentenced to 35 years in prison, and David Miranda was detained in Heathrow airport for nine hours while helping his partner, the Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald, obtain documents related to NSA spying. How worried should journalists be when reporting on political, international affairs or national security? How should journalists work in the surveillance state and continue to report? This week’s Mediatwits will feature Tow Center director and former Guardian editor Emily Bell, NYU J-school professor and PressThink blogger Jay Rosen and Free Press’ Josh Stearns. MediaShift’s Mark Glaser hosts, along with Ana Marie Cox from The Guardian, Mónica Guzmán from the Seattle Times and GeekWire and Andrew Lih from American University.

Get the full rundown and guest bios here.

PBS clip 8.30.13

How will we teach the next generation of the journalists?

Such is the question raised in PBS MediaShift’s “Back to J-School” special, and we want you to help us find out.

Will J-schools flip the curriculum, focusing more on digital skills than journalism basics? Will they flip the classroom, moving most learning online and turning class time into lab time?

Or will they embrace MOOCs and other forms of online class offerings as a component of the future of journalism education?

Check out the current list, and add to it! This is my first official attempt at crowdsourcing, and I want you to be a part of it.

'Why I quit my internship'

It’s with a heavy heart that I announce that I’ll be leaving PBS MediaShift (and it’s podcast, Mediatwits) on Sept. 4.

Long story short, I realized I needed to spend more time on my academic pursuits (especially when all of my homework is in Spanish) and exploring Costa Rica to its fullest extent.

Read this post on IFSA-Butler’s Study Abroad blog on my reasoning to give up the best internship I’ve ever had.

Thanks to Steff Dazio, Paige Jones, Rachel Karas and probably other people who told me to do this a long time ago and waited for me to make my own decision. I appreciate your patience and your concern for my well-being.


 

 

Digital disruption has changed the landscape of the media world, and journalism and communication schools need to figure out how to educate in a time of vast change. The schools themselves need to change too, or risk falling behind. As part of this week’s special “Back to J-School 2013,” in-depth report at MediaShift, this episode of the Mediatwits will talk to students and professors alike on the value of a journalism education, the future of education innovation and more. Special guests this week are Howard Finberg, creator of NewsU at the Poynter Institute;Eva Avenue, former editor-in-chief of the Daily Lobo at the University of New Mexico; and San Diego State University professor and Knight Center MOOC coordinator Amy Schmitz Weiss. MediaShift’s Mark Glaser hosts, along with Andrew Lih from American University.

Check out a rundown of all the latest research on this topic, as well as guest bios.


 

 

It’s a scary but exciting world for newspaper owners right now, especially if they’re in a selling mood. Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon, bought the Washington Post last week (while our podcast was on vacation — great timing!), and Red Sox owner John Henry bought the Boston Globe before that. As newspapers continue to struggle to raise advertising or subscription revenue, will the journalism industry be aided or hindered when it’s owned by billionaires? Special guests Nick Wingfield from the New York Times and Jack Shafer from Reuters join this week’s episode of the Mediatwits. MediaShift’s Mark Glaser hosts, along with Mónica Guzmán from the Seattle Times and GeekWire, Ana Marie Cox from the Guardian and Andrew Lih from American University.

 
Check out guest bios and story research.

'Storify: Jeff Bezos Shocks the World, Buys Washington Post'

D.C.’s hometown paper announced Aug. 5 that Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, bought the Washington Post and a number of other Post Co.-owned newspapers for $250 million. The Post has been controlled by the Graham family for 80 years. Here’s how journalists — at the Post and beyond — reacted to the news, as well as all the background on Bezos and his deal with the Grahams.

See the full Storify here.

UPDATE Aug. 7, with reader reactions:

I don’t always read Storifys about breaking media news, but when I do, I prefer Storifys compiled by Zach C. Cohen.
Rhys Heyden, staff writer San Luis Obispo New Times and former classmate at American University

 

 

Google Glass could have a transformative effect on journalism, especially as we watch Tim Pool from VICE use Google Glass to report on Turkish protests. But it’s important to examine the shortfalls as well as all the great new advancements, both real and prophesied. Special guests Rackspace’s Robert Scoble, Veterans United’s Sarah Hill, CUNY’s Jeff Jarvis and USC Annenberg’s Robert Hernandez, all early adopters of Google Glass as well as social media and journalism experts, will talk about their experiences with the device and what they see as its strengths and weaknesses for its potential future in journalism. MediaShift’s Mark Glaser hosts, along with Ana Marie Cox from the Guardian and Andrew Lih from American University.

Watch or listen to the podcast here, and tune in every Friday at 10:30 a.m. PT / 1:30 p.m. ET.